Home

About Me

BeerBooks.com  

Mr. Beer - Makes A Great Gift!

Support this site, visit My Store

Addison
Amarillo
Austin
Bastrop
Bellville
Blanco
Boerne
Brackettville
Brenham
Bryan
Castroville
Cleburne
Columbus
Comfort
Conroe
Cuero
Dallas
El Paso
Eola
Fayetteville
Flatonia
Fort Worth
Fredericksburg
Galveston
Giddings
High Hill
Houston
Industry
Johnson City La Grange
Laredo
Longview
Marble Falls
McKinney
Meyersville
Millheim
Mingus
New Braunfels
New Ulm
Paris
Port Arthur
Round Top
San Angelo
San Antonio
Seguin
Serbin
Shiner
Tyler
Victoria
Waco
Weatherford
Yorktown
Unknown

Sources

Links

 

 

Galveston

Galveston Brewing Company 1895-1918
Galveston-Houston Breweries Inc. 1934-1955
Falstaff Brewing Corporation 1956-1981

Adolphus Busch and William J. Lemp of St. Louis were both major stockholders that raised $400,000 to found the Galveston Brewing Company in 1895. Since Galveston is an island, water was the critical problem. By 1895, the city of Galveston had a water works department that utilized piped in water from the Alta Loma wells on the mainland, eighteen miles from the coast. In 1906, several wells were dug that gave them a combined water supply of two million gallons per day. The Galveston brewery was so well constructed that it survived the Hurricane of 1900 that destroyed most of Galveston and killed an estimated 6,000 people. (For an exciting account of the Hurricane of 1900, read Isaac's Storm, by Erik Larson.) After prohibition forced the legal production of beer to cease, the brewery produced a nonintoxicating cereal beverage called Galvo. This was basically the beer with the alcohol removed, or "near beer." This product proved unsuccessful, and the brewery removed the brewing equipment to produce soft drinks as the XXX Company. It opened again in 1934 as the Galveston-Houston Breweries, Inc.

Photo from the Falstaff Brewery History Page.

J. A. Brockman 1906-1906

Weiss & Son 1907-1909
Herman Weiss was living in San Antonio in 1900, when the hurricane destroyed Galveston. Perhaps seeking opportunity in the new city, shortly afterward, he moved to Galveston. His sons, Herman, Jr. and Charles, helped him at the brewery. The Weisses closed their brewery and moved to Shiner run the brewery there. Who knows, maybe the pressure of competing against Busch and Lemp's Galveston Brewing Company was too much. The photo below was taken around 1900. Herman sits beside his wife, Herman Jr. is on the far left and Charles is on the far right.

This information (and the photo) comes from Keith Holt. The young man in front of Herman is his grandfather. And, yes, Keith and I are related. Distantly. Which means I am also distantly related to Herman Weiss. Small world, ain't it?